• Overview
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Understanding the Cost of WASH in Health Care Facilities:  Where Do We Start?

Purpose of this Webinar

Cost data are critical to ensuring sustainable water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) service delivery in healthcare facilities (HCF), but standardized cost collection methods are lacking. Researchers at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill developed a 10-step costing model method to collect cost evidence. CDC researchers calculated total program costs for a short-term WASH program in 117 HCF in 5 districts in western Kenya. These researchers provide valuable insight into understanding costs data collection in WASH in HCF.

Webinar Summary

The document below provides a comprehensive summary of the webinar, including challenges to implementing the approach, and important points and questions raised in the discussion portion of the webinar.

Webinar 6 Full Summary (PDF)

Recommended Actions

The document below provides an overview of actionable steps for addressing gaps in WASH in HCF costing research.

Webinar 6 Action Document (PDF)

Understanding the Cost of WASH in Health Care Facilities:  Where Do We Start?

Webinar 6 PowerPoint Slides- Rob Quick (PDF)

Webinar 6 PowerPoint Slides- Darcy Anderson (PDF)

Webinar 6 Full Summary (PDF)

Recommended Actions

The document below provides an overview of actionable steps for addressing gaps in WASH in HCF costing research.

Webinar 6 Action Document (PDF)

Additional Resources

1. Environmental conditions in health care facilities in low- and middle-income countries: Coverage and inequalities –Cronk and Bartram

Visit the link above to learn about previously undocumented inequalities and environmental health challenges faced by HCF in LMICs.

2. Water, sanitation and hygiene in health care facilities: Global strategy, burden of disease, and evidence and action priorities –WHO, UNICEF and Share

Visit the link above to view the workshop report of the global strategy, burden of disease, and evidence and action priorities for WASH in HCF, London, 2016.

3. Acceptability and Use of Portable Drinking Water and Hand Washing Stations in Health Care Facilities and Their Impact on Patient Hygiene Practices, Western Kenya –Bennett et al.

This paper describes the installation of low-cost, low-maintenance, locally-available, portable hand washing and drinking water stations in rural HCFs in Western Kenya without access to 24-hour piped water.

4. Cost analysis of the implementation of portable hand washing and drinking water stations in rural Kenyan health facilities –Freedman, et al.

This paper describes the cost analysis of the implementation of portable hand washing and drinking water stations in rural HCFs in Western Kenya.

5. EHSinHCFcosting@unc.edu

Click in the link above to email for more information about the University of North Carolina’s Environmental Health Services in HCF costing project. Participate in collaborative review of costing tools, frameworks, and models. Share costs data.